Forum: Other

Post: Pricing/licensing info?

Pricing/licensing info?
itistoday
May 20, 2010
Will VoltDB be free to use like PostgreSQL/MySQL or will it be more like Oracle's DB (pay-to-use?).

Sorry if this is a stupid question.
re: Will VoltDB be free
bheath
May 20, 2010
Not a stupid question at all.

Hang on until next Wednesday (May 26) for an announcement. Look out for Mike Stonebraker's keynote at Gluecon:
http://www.gluecon.com/2010/Glue2010_Agenda.htm

Bobbi
I've noticed the open-source
cchaulk
May 26, 2010
Not a stupid question at all.

Hang on until next Wednesday (May 26) for an announcement. Look out for Mike Stonebraker's keynote at Gluecon:
http://www.gluecon.com/2010/Glue2010_Agenda.htm

Bobbi


I've noticed the open-source license is GPL v3. Any chance you could change that to GPL v2 or dual-license ?
Licensing
rbetts
May 26, 2010
I've noticed the open-source license is GPL v3. Any chance you could change that to GPL v2 or dual-license ?


You can purchase a commercial version of VoltDB under a proprietary VoltDB license.

We can not distribute a GPLv2 version of VoltDB because we have chosen to use some Apache licensed third party components.

See: http://www.apache.org/licenses/GPL-compatibility.html
Where can I find more
itistoday
May 26, 2010
You can purchase a commercial version of VoltDB under a proprietary VoltDB license.

We can not distribute a GPLv2 version of VoltDB because we have chosen to use some Apache licensed third party components.

See: http://www.apache.org/licenses/GPL-compatibility.html


Where can I find more information about all of this? (Prices, the license you mention, etc.)
re: pricing and licensing
tcallaghan
May 26, 2010
Where can I find more information about all of this? (Prices, the license you mention, etc.)


VoltDB Pricing is available at



http://www.voltdb.com/community/community-home.php

.

The community edition license is GPL3 as outlined at



http://www.voltdb.com/community/community-home.php

, it also contains a copy of our contributor license agreement.

If you'd like a copy of proprietary license please send an email to sales@voltdb.com.

-Tim
VoltDB
Thanks for the info!
itistoday
May 26, 2010
VoltDB Pricing is available at http://www.voltdb.com/pricing.

The community edition license is GPL3 as outlined at http://community.voltdb.com/getinvolved, it also contains a copy of our contributor license agreement.

If you'd like a copy of proprietary license please send an email to sales@voltdb.com.

-Tim
VoltDB


Thanks for the info!
Licensing
cchaulk
May 26, 2010
You can purchase a commercial version of VoltDB under a proprietary VoltDB license.

We can not distribute a GPLv2 version of VoltDB because we have chosen to use some Apache licensed third party components.

See: http://www.apache.org/licenses/GPL-compatibility.html


Other open-source GPL v2 projects also include Apache 2.0 licenses though. If you're just redistributing unchanged Apache 2.0 libraries I don't see the issue.
The FSF does not recognize
rbetts
May 26, 2010
Other open-source GPL v2 projects also include Apache 2.0 licenses though. If you're just redistributing unchanged Apache 2.0 libraries I don't see the issue.


The FSF does not recognize these licenses as compatible [1] and we have decided to respect their opinion in this matter.

I agree with you - the distinction is slight and a frustrating barrier. I can understand why other projects have interpreted this compatibility differently. However, consistent with our careful treatment of license and IP matters, we've chosen to follow the FSF's position with respect to their license.

[1] http://www.gnu.org/licenses/license-list.html#GPLIncompatibleLicenses
Licensing
JHarker
May 27, 2010
The FSF does not recognize these licenses as compatible [1] and we have decided to respect their opinion in this matter.

I agree with you - the distinction is slight and a frustrating barrier. I can understand why other projects have interpreted this compatibility differently. However, consistent with our careful treatment of license and IP matters, we've chosen to follow the FSF's position with respect to their license.

[1] http://www.gnu.org/licenses/license-list.html#GPLIncompatibleLicenses


Hi,

Sorry I ask my question here but I didn't want to garbage your forum. :)
So, I have another license-related question. In your VoltDB Pricing page you stated that VoltDB is GPL-d, and there are no rights to embedded it into commercial projects.

Let's say that I've got 4 nodes in my cluster that keeps data used in service (let's say the product is automated website creator). So I keep all this data (gathered from website creator) on VoltDB cluster but I earn money by developing this website creator which is not GPL-d.
To the point... As I understood this qualifies this product as commercial and I cannot use VoltDB without paying license. Right?
You can use the free version
rbetts
May 27, 2010
Hi,

Sorry I ask my question here but I didn't want to garbage your forum. :)
So, I have another license-related question. In your VoltDB Pricing page you stated that VoltDB is GPL-d, and there are no rights to embedded it into commercial projects.


You can use the free version of VoltDB for commercial purposes. We hope you will! The GPL doesn't affect commercial vs. non-commercial use. It affects under what terms you can distribute a derived product.

Building a VoltDB application to use with a website creator does not require you to GPL your website creator product. Calling stored procedures is not sufficient to trigger the GPL's derived product definition.

If, on the other hand, you take some source code from VoltDB or hack on VoltDB a little to make it run in the same process space as your application, then distribution of your derived product would have to comply with the terms of the GPL.

Basically, if you change VoltDB source code and redistribute that change, you have to be willing to share your patches if the recipient asks for them.

You might find the FSF's explanation clearer:

http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html#GPLRequireSourcePostedPublic


"The GPL does not require you to release your modified version, or any part of it. You are free to make modifications and use them privately, without ever releasing them. This applies to organizations (including companies), too; an organization can make a modified version and use it internally without ever releasing it outside the organization.

But if you release the modified version to the public in some way, the GPL requires you to make the modified source code available to the program's users, under the GPL.

Thus, the GPL gives permission to release the modified program in certain ways, and not in other ways; but the decision of whether to release it is up to you."
rbetts, thank you for
itistoday
May 27, 2010
You can use the free version of VoltDB for commercial purposes. We hope you will! The GPL doesn't affect commercial vs. non-commercial use. It affects under what terms you can distribute a derived product.


rbetts, thank you for clearing that up! I was under the impression that to use VoltDB in a commercial product a license would need to be purchased, even if you're using it behind the scenes and not redistributing the source code that's using VoltDB.

If that is not the case then that's great news and should help its adoption! I know that it may seem obvious or trivial to you, but I suspect this is not to many many others, so you may want to consider making this clear on the pricing page, as otherwise people who otherwise would use and proselytize the "Greatness of VoltDB (TM)" would be put off and use some other solution.

At least that fits my situation, I can only imagine I'm not the only one. :-p
I suspected that is the case
JHarker
May 28, 2010
You can use the free version of VoltDB for commercial purposes. We hope you will! The GPL doesn't affect commercial vs. non-commercial use. It affects under what terms you can distribute a derived product.


I suspected that is the case but wasn't sure about that, besides this "Commercial embedding rights - Within GPL products only" got me little confused. I must have misunderstood the statement.

Thank you rbetts for so quick and full answer.

Best Regards,
JHarker