Forum: Installation

Post: Volt installation guidelines for a private cloud

Volt installation guidelines for a private cloud
mquinlan
May 3, 2013
Hi

We want to install Volt on our Ubuntu private cloud and we were looking for some guidelines in the forums.

The only thing we found was this: https://forum.voltdb.com/showthread.php?152-VoltDB-on-Amazon-AWS

Some aspects of Volt make putting it on the cloud a little tricky, e.g. turning off segmentation offload.

Are there are set of guidelines available for cloud deployments rather than bare metal deployments?

Thanks
prosegay
May 7, 2013
There are no specific guidelines for private cloud installations, we recommend you follow the guidelines for bare-metal installations. AWS recommendations may also be helpful. Generally, you will give up performance and throughput may be negatively impacted due to the virutalization layer.
mquinlan
May 8, 2013
There are no specific guidelines for private cloud installations, we recommend you follow the guidelines for bare-metal installations. AWS recommendations may also be helpful. Generally, you will give up performance and throughput may be negatively impacted due to the virutalization layer.


Thanks. The problem is that turning off segmentation offloading at the ethernet card level doesn't make the container very portable. We are ok with isolating disks for the snapshots etc.

Any other ideas?
aweisberg
May 8, 2013
Thanks. The problem is that turning off segmentation offloading at the ethernet card level doesn't make the container very portable. We are ok with isolating disks for the snapshots etc.

Any other ideas?


Can you explain the problematic interaction you are talking about between the TCP stack config and the container? Which type of virtualization are you talking about and what is the portability issue?

I think that container based virtualization is something we are not as familiar with. I remember we had some issues with the way memory utilization was measured with OpenVZ, it considered virtual memory to be equivalent to physical WRT to resource limits. Paravirtualization and HVM (Virtualbox, Xen, VMWare) is something we have more experience with and we have found them to be well behaved.
mquinlan
May 19, 2013
Can you explain the problematic interaction you are talking about between the TCP stack config and the container? Which type of virtualization are you talking about and what is the portability issue?

I think that container based virtualization is something we are not as familiar with. I remember we had some issues with the way memory utilization was measured with OpenVZ, it considered virtual memory to be equivalent to physical WRT to resource limits. Paravirtualization and HVM (Virtualbox, Xen, VMWare) is something we have more experience with and we have found them to be well behaved.


Hi Ariel

We're not having any problems at the moment as I was just following the release notes for a bare metal deployment and wondering how to convert that to a virtual environment.

I'm getting two containers set up this week to check stability and will let you know the results.

We use Cloudstack as the cloud platform (http://cloudstack.apache.org/) and I believe Xen as the virtualization layer. All this is running instances of Ubuntu 12.04.

Mik
aweisberg
May 21, 2013
Hi,

We have done a lot of testing with Xen via AWS and haven't had any issues. We do find that para virtualization performs better than HVM when it comes to network IO. I usually use the Ubuntu AMI and don't change any of the system configuration. That said we aren't managing the hosts (only guests).

Ariel
mquinlan
Jul 19, 2013
Thanks, Ariel.

To follow up on this we ran a 10,000 TPS performance test for an hour on a cloud version of 2 nodes of Volt Community successfully.

The partition execution time (not initiator) was double that of our bare metal servers for the same database configuration which is to be expected.

Great news and we are going to use this to simplify our architectures as Volt allows us to remove distributed caches that always seem to end up fronting traditional RDBMS's.

Hi,

We have done a lot of testing with Xen via AWS and haven't had any issues. We do find that para virtualization performs better than HVM when it comes to network IO. I usually use the Ubuntu AMI and don't change any of the system configuration. That said we aren't managing the hosts (only guests).

Ariel